Cold Sesame Noodles

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These cold sesame noodles are delicious, cheap, super easy to make and take five minutes from start to finish. All you need is pantry ingredients and a bit of cabbage and/or carrot.

cold sesame noodles

How to make cold sesame noodles:

You start by whisking together sesame oil, natural peanut butter, honey, soy sauce, rice vinegar, sambal and coconut milk.

Next you toss freshly cooked soba noodles into the sauce, followed by a few vegetables like shredded carrots and/or cabbage for both crunch and freshness. And that’s already all there is to it!

soba noodles

More delicious Asian-inspired recipes:

cold sesame noodles
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Cold Sesame Noodles

These cold sesame noodles are delicious, cheap, super easy to make and take five minutes from start to finish. All you need is pantry ingredients and a bit of cabbage and/or carrot.
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Chinese
Keyword: cold sesame noodles
Servings: 2
Calories: 400kcal

Ingredients:

  • 4 ounces soba noodles, uncooked
  • 1/2 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons natural peanut butter (with peanuts as the only ingredient)
  • 1/2 teaspoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sambal (more if you like it spicier)
  • 2 tablespoons coconut milk
  • mint leaves and sesame seeds, optional
  • shredded cabbage and/or carrot

Instructions:

  • Cook the soba noodles according to package instructions, then thoroughly rinse them with cold water.
  • Whisk oil, peanut butter, honey, soy sauce, rice vinegar, sambal and coconut milk together until smooth.
  • Toss the cold noodles with the sauce, sprinkle with mint leaves and sesame seeds (if using), add shredded vegetables and serve immediately.
  • Whatever you don't eat you need to throw away, you cannot store this noodle dish.

Nutrition

Calories: 400kcal

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cold sesame noodles

12 comments

  1. Marissa says:

    I have got to try these, Nicole. They look simple and delicious. And thank you for reminding me about ‘Cooked’ – I’ve been meaning to check it out…love Michael Pollan’s books.

    • Nicole B. says:

      That’s exactly what they are, simple and delicious. I bet you’ll love Cooked, it’s so beautiful (and interesting) but the beauty is what’s going to stay in my memory. :)

    • Nicole B. says:

      That is soooo nice of you to say, Louise, thank you! I did have to play around with the set (and the food) for quite a while before I arrived at this photo… :)

  2. Sabrina says:

    Saw this recipe on Foodgawker and immediately recognized your style <3
    Love this recipe because of its simplicity.
    I thought about doing a similar dish this week with Shirataki and Peanut Sauce. But I really like your combination and probably will try it :)

    With warmth, Sabrina

    • Nicole B. says:

      “Saw this recipe on Foodgawker and immediately recognized your style <3"

      That is such an awesome compliment, thank you, Sabrina!!

  3. Melinda | Sprinkle and a Dash says:

    Ahh, Nicole. You did the dish justice with your photography. It looks very Asian and classy. The ingredients sound wonderful together and like you said I have everything in my pantry, except soba noodles. But that can be fixed. It is going to be a hot week, I’m looking forward to a nice cold lunch. =D

  4. Marisa Franca @ All Our Way says:

    I think it is so sad that people don’t take the time to cook. To me it’s a labor of love — now I’m trying to learn photography and I’m sure when I become more knowledgeable I will enjoy doing that too. It’s not just my daughter who loves to cook but my two sons also. Now your noodles may be brown but your photo is gorgeous. They draw me in and I want to dig in. Beautiful shot.

    • Nicole B. says:

      It is sad, I agree and I don’t know what the answers are. I think it would require a fundamental change in our society’s mindset toward attaching more value to the art of the homecooked meal before anything would change. And that’s not something I see happening anytime soon. :(

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